Monday, May 25, 2020

Key Legislation Governing Special Education - 819 Words

Key Legislation Governing Special Education The three key legislations governing special education that affect special education are the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Americans with Disabilities Act. These legislations work together to protect people with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities Act is a federal law that protects the educational rights of children with disabilities. Within The Individuals with Disabilities Act there are six principle that guarantee the rights of the student with the disability and their parents. The principles are zero reject, free appropriate public education, least restrictive environment, nondiscriminatory evaluation, parent and family right to confidentiality, and procedural safeguards. Zero reject states that public education is entitled to all students with disabilities, and the severity of the disability does not affect this. Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE), makes sure that the public education that the stude nt receives is free, and a parent or other family member is not asked to pay for their education. A student’s least restrictive environment is how they receive their education, and this means that the student with disability is educated is a setting as close to their peers as possible. If the student is removed from this setting, the educational professionals must justify why that student is being moved. Any assessment that is completed to determineShow MoreRelatedThe Schools And Public Schools Essay1639 Words   |  7 PagesFor children from birth to 5 years of age (Early Years) the childcare centres are usually community or trust schools, these are mostly run by the school governing body or by a charitable foundation. Children from the ages of 5 to 16 are entitled to a free place at state school. The different categories of schools are: Community schools run by the local authorities, which as owners of the land and buildings are responsible for upkeep etc. The local authorities are also responsible for the admissionsRead MoreU.s. Government Legislation And Policy Environment Essay903 Words   |  4 PagesOverview This case study provides a brief overview of the U.S. government legislation and policy environment as well as impacts on an organization. The essential legal policies for instituting an information security policy for any organization, regardless of tax status, such as commercial, non-profit entity or a federal agency and how those policies, both governmental and organizational, can impact an organization’s ability to ensure the integral information security triad of confidentialityRead MoreCongressional Committees and Healthcare Policy Essay1130 Words   |  5 PagesAn important point made in Weissert and Weissert concerning Congress and its committee structure is that the majority of the work in Congress is done through committees. They perform the majority of research on issues and possible solutions, get legislation written, re-written and amended, and support it as it moves through Congress and finally gets passed. They are the â€Å"workhorses of the legislatureâ⠂¬  (Weissert and Weissert, 29). The breadth of information on any given issue that has to be assimilatedRead MoreUnit 3024935 Words   |  20 Pagesearly years’ education (Refer to Childcare Act 2006 and Every Child matters) (1.1) As part of the Childcare Act 2006 and every child matters, all 3 and 4 year old children in England are able to receive free, part time early years education, up to 15 hours per week, for a school year of 38 weeks per year. Early year’s education follows the Early Years Foundation Stage guidance which was simplified in September 2012 and the Government funds local authorities. Early year’s education can be foundRead MoreSchools as Organisations3945 Words   |  16 Pages It covers key aspects of schools as organisations. This includes the structure of the education system, the roles and responsibilities of key members of the school team and the purpose of school ethos, mission statement and aims and values. Learners will also understand the reasons for the key legislation, policies and procedures which are followed in schools and how schools operate within a wider context. Learning outcomes 1 Know the different types of schools in the education sector 2 KnowRead MoreThe Indian Act Of 18691646 Words   |  7 Pagesprotect (Dickason and Newbigging 293). Until the 16th century, Aboriginal people were the only inhabitants of Canada, they were an independent and self-governing people till the European invasion (Elias 1). The European Invasion brought about The 1876 Indian Act, which was developed over time through separate pieces of colonial legislation regarding Aboriginal peoples across Canada such as the Gradual Civilization Act of 1857 and the Gradual Enfranchisement Act of 1869. In 1876, these acts wereRead MoreTDA 3.2 schools and organisation Essay examples3547 Words   |  15 Pagesprovision for early year’s education? Every child matters agenda and the childcare act 2006, it become an entitlement of all 3-4 year olds in England to receive a free part time early years education of up to 12.5 hours per week for 38 weeks of the year. Early year’s provision in school is about supporting very young children it is distinct from key stage 1 in each country within the UK and is best on the concept of learning through play rather than more formal education Play has been show to beRead MoreEssay on Tda 3.2 Assignment Schools as Organisations9471 Words   |  38 PagesTDA 3.2 Schools as Organisations 1. Know the structure of education from early years to post compulsory education. 1.1 Summarise entitlement provision for early year’s education. Every child who on the term commencing after their 3rd Birthday is entitled to a free part time place in early years education. This was formed as part of the Every Child Matters agenda. From 0-5 years the framework of learning, development care forms the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), which follows theRead MoreHow Schools Are Organised in Terms of Roles and Responsibilities2233 Words   |  9 Pagesstrategic purpose of: a. School Governors Schools are run by a governing body working with the head teacher and senior management team to ensure pupils get a good education. Becoming a governor could be a way of contributing to your local school and learning new skills. Who can become a school governor? You dont need to have a child at a school to become a governor All types of people can become school governors. No special qualifications are required, but you must be 18 or over on the dateRead MoreEssay about Tda 3.2, Schools as Organisations4740 Words   |  19 PagesTDA 3.2 (1.1, 1.2, 1.3) Part 1 Produce a flow chart outlining the structure of education from early years to post sixteen. Add an explanation of the entitlement of early year’s education and characteristics of different types of school. Flow Chart outlining structure from early years to post 16 years [pic] Early Years Foundation Stage (eyfs) In the education system of this country children do not have to attend school until they are 5 years old but

Thursday, May 14, 2020

The Six Senses Of Helping Others Essay - 709 Words

The Six Senses of Helping Others By Deanne P Wells | Submitted On January 08, 2015 Recommend Article Article Comments Print Article Share this article on Facebook Share this article on Twitter Share this article on Google+ 1 Share this article on Linkedin Share this article on StumbleUpon Share this article on Delicious Share this article on Digg Share this article on Reddit Share this article on Pinterest Expert Author Deanne P Wells Believe, when you are most unhappy, that there is something for you to do in the world. So long as you can sweeten another s pain, life is not in vain. ~ Helen Keller How well do you know the truth of that statement? How often do you turn a cold shoulder, look the other way, or shunt a deaf ear when another is in need? Helen Keller may have been blind and deaf, but as she often said, If I could not see it, I could smell it. How many times do we act like we are blind and deaf to helping others in need? Or for that matter... mute? Do we secretly yearn for our own disabilities in order to shut out what we choose not to see or hear? The five senses: sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch. But, what about the sixth sense? A power of perception seemingly independent of the five senses; keen intuition. Our intuition: a direct perception of truth and fact; independent of any reasoning process with our immediate apprehension. How many of us go through life not living to the full potential of our senses when others are in need? OurShow MoreRelatedBonding Between Client And Therapist Essay1384 Words   |  6 Pagestheory, research journal, 45, 431-433. doi: 10.1037/a0014330. The purpose of this paper to provide a step-by-step explanation to show how bonding between a client and a therapist is fundamental in a therapeutic situation. The paper is divided into six parts with each part describing the importance of bonding with your client In the first step, one way that could be useful for bonding with a client is genuineness, which is the ability to meet person-to-person by listening and communicating with clientsRead MoreAn Investigation Into Response For Disaster Using Qualitative Methods1539 Words   |  7 Pagesinvolved in the London underground bombings in 2005. Throughout this investigation, thematic analysis was conducted on six eyewitness accounts, highlighting their feelings and actions, which came about as a result of the incident. From these accounts I obtained 4 key themes, which were consistent components of the six accounts. Evidently, I found that the two most common themes were ‘helping behaviour’ and the ‘panic’ myth. This was rather unexpected, as initially, I expected to find irrational and helplessRead MoreCommunity Service Activities Through The Alternative Breaks Program At Florida1311 Words   |  6 Pageslife with the bare minimum or even less than that. As stated in the article Self-compassion, empathy, and helping intentions (Welp Brown, 2013) Because the self is often the anchor to which judgments of others are grounded (Brown, Young, McConnell, 2009 Brown, C. M., Young, S. G., McConnell, A. R. (2009). a compassionate orientation to the self may produce more tenderness toward others as well. I hypothesized that if I volunteer in community service, then I would be more sympathetic to theRead MoreWhy Animals Can Help With Development And Social Skills1251 Words   |  6 Pagespercent of the population owns at least one pet in their household, leaving the other 38 percent animal-free but how come they do not have one? Maybe because they hate animals or don t have the essentials to care for one. Maybe they simply just are not sure if they want one. Although many people do not have pets, having an animal as a pet comes with many benefits. Some include helping with children, lowering depression, helping the blind, or simply to be the man s bestfriend. I want to discuss pets andRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs893 Words   |  4 Pagesinvolved with the child’s well-being. The main aim of the approach is to help those individuals who have been affected through the initial process of growing up. The damage caused through lack of enriched parental care for the child the child can form a sense of low self-esteem, if this occurs, it could affect the individual’s outlook on life making the individual feel unwanted or loved. For example, if the child believes that they are no good at something, say football, the child becomes quiet and unableRead MoreThe, The Branch Of Science And Medicine Concerned With The Sense Of Hearing1060 Words   |  5 PagesAUDIOLOGY SERVICES (Audiology: the branch of science and medicine concerned with the sense of hearing.) This program includes Paediatric Diagnostic Hearing Assessments, which are necessary to find out whether a child is deaf or losing their hearing. It is ideal to pick up on deafness in it s earliest stages, so using this technology on newborns is significantly beneficial. Another program that runs in the audiology services, is the Cochlear Implants Program. First, the child is tested to see ifRead MoreMy Journey Towards Becoming A Preschool Teacher1390 Words   |  6 Pagesthe different child development theorists throughout history, as well as the six key social-emotional life skills, which the theorists identify and acknowledge as well. Additionally, the knowledge of philosophies already used in schools has influenced my thought on teaching and how I will teach my students and your children. Like I stated above, a big influence on my teaching philosophy stems from my knowledge of the six social-emotional life skills. In order to be an active member of our societyRead MoreReflection Of Communication And Communication1152 Words   |  5 Pagesfact that I took away from the cause is the process of helping at the veterans in our community; we talked on this course about resources in our society that will assist people that have served in the way. Certain things like VA hospitals and helping them deal with their past trauma. The fourth resource that I took away from this course is learning about the multiple career counseling theories; this will assist in my communication and helping with my client as it relates to their future goals. TheRead MoreObservation Paper1649 Words   |  7 Pageslearning experiences. Observations allow the educator to determine what the child knows, can do and understand (Early Childhood Australia, 2012, p.1). Observations help the educator to imp lement experiences, which are of interest to the children helping to build on their knowledge. According to Curtis Carter (2013, p. 16) educators have many demands and distractions; therefore learning to pay attention requires systematic study and ongoing practice. It was nice to conduct an experience with twoRead More The Effect of Divorce on Children Essay1104 Words   |  5 Pages Some children of divorced families have long-term behavior problems such as depression, low self-esteem, poor school performance, acting out, and difficulties with intimate relationships. Children with divorced or divorcing parents often have a sense of abandonment, because their parents become too preoccupied with their own psychological, social, and economic distress that they forget about their kids? needs (Lamb and Sternberg, 1997). In 1988, Professor Jeanne Dise-Lewis conducted a survey of

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or...

Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings. 1.1 Explain what is meant by: †¢ Diversity - Each person is individual and unique - Encompass respect and acceptance - It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerance - â€Å"Differences between individuals and groups of people† Diversity is about respecting individual differences these can be: ethnicity, physical abilities, gender, age, religious, beliefs, sexual orientation, material status, politic, region, religion, disability. †¢ Inclusion - Inclusion is about taking action to remove barriers - Also involves eliminating discrimination - Inclusion promotes equality - It is the â€Å"process of identifying,†¦show more content†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¢ Providing a childcare place, wherever possible, for children who may have learning difficulties and/or disabilities or are deemed disadvantaged according to their individuals circumstances and the nursery’s ability to provide the necessary standard of care. †¢ We support children in the acquisition of language. We ask parents to translate the words which are mainly use at home: mummy, daddy, teddy, dolly, dummy, blanket, bed, sleep, water, potty, toilet, up, down, garden, wash hands. †¢ Liaising with other settings to making sure that children have smooth transition. †¢ We provide play equipment and resources which are safe and where applicable †¢ We provide a sufficient quantity of equipment and resources for the number of children †¢ We select books, equipment and resources which promote continuity and progression, provide sufficient challenge and meet the needs and interests of all children †¢ We provide made, natural and recycled materials which are clean, in good condition and safe for children to use †¢ We provide furniture which are suitable for children and for adults †¢ We store and display resources and equipment whereShow MoreRelatedPromote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings1918 Words   |  8 PagesCU1532 PROMOTE EQUALITY AND INCLUSION IN HEALTH, SOCIAL CARE OR CHILDREN’S AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S SETTINGS Understand the importance of diversity, equality and inclusion Explain what is meant by diversity; equality; inclusion Diversity can be defined in many different ways. What does it mean to us? Diversity is a commitment to recognizing and appreciating the variety of characteristics that make individuals unique in an atmosphere that promotes and celebrates individual and collectiveRead MoreUnit 4222-303 Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings1578 Words   |  7 PagesUnit 4222-303 Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings Outcome 1 Understand the importance of diversity, equality and inclusion 1. Explain what is meant by Diversity, Equality and Inclusion Equality Equality is the term for treating people fairly and offering the same chances, it’s not all about treating everyone in the same way, but recognising everyone is different, and they all have very different needs, but making sure they are metRead MoreUnit 4222-303 Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings Outcome 1: Understand the importance of diversity, equality and inclusion1112 Words   |  5 PagesUnit 4222-303 Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings Outcome 1: Understand the importance of diversity, equality and inclusion 1. Explain what is meant by: Diversity – In the literal sense the word ‘diversity’ means different. Through diversity we recognise the uniqueness of the individual and value these differences. Diversity can consist of factors which include personal characteristics such as background, culture, personality and work-styleRead MoreNvq Level 3 Essay779 Words   |  4 PagesPromote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social care or Children’s and Young People’s settings 1.1 Explain what is meant by * Diversity * Equality * Inclusion Diversity basically means difference. Diversity is about understanding that everyone has things in common but also that everyone is different. Diversity is about embracing those differences because if everything and everyone was the same then life would be boaring. Some examples of diversity are listed below: Read MoreEssay about Unit 53 Equality and Inclusion1425 Words   |  6 Pages UNIT 053- PROMOTE EQUALITY AND INCLUSION IN HEALTH, SOCIAL OR CHILDREN’S AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S SETTINGS 1.1 Diversity- Two definitions of Diversity are: Diversity- acknowledgement of and respect for their individuality. Diversity- celebrating differences and valuing everyone. By respecting visible and invisible differences everyone can feel valued for their contribution, beneficial for both the individual and the setting. Equality- Two definitions of Equality are: Equality- equal opportunitiesRead MoreCu1532/Shc 33: Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social918 Words   |  4 PagesCU1532/SHC 33: Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings 1.1. Explain what is meant by: ï‚ · diversity - It means that we are all different from each other. Whether it is our gender, height, weight, ethnic background, religion, beliefs, our personalities, disabilities or sexuality. ï‚ · equality – It means that regardless of our race, gender, or sexuality, everyone should be treated as equal and given the same opportunities to achieve theirRead MorePromote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s1094 Words   |  5 PagesPromote Equality and inclusion in Health, Social care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings (SHC33) Outcome 1 : Understand the importance of diversity. Equality and inclusion 1. Explain what is meant by: Diveristy, Equality and Inclusion †¢ Diversity is about acknowledging your prejudices, allowing people to be different and respecting these differences. It is also about challenging others if necessary and speaking up for the individuals you support when they cannot speak up forRead MoreSch 33 Equality and Inclusion in Health Essay1552 Words   |  7 PagesSHC 33 Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings 1. Explain what is meant by: Diversity Equality Inclusion Mean by Diversity the differences between individuals and groups in society arising from gender, ethnic origins, social, cultural or religious background, family structure, disabilities, sexuality and appearance. Our society is made up of people with a wide range of characteristics. Where people vary in a multitude of ways, includingRead MoreLevel 3 Diploma In Health And Social Care Docx Assignment Brief1808 Words   |  8 Pagesï » ¿ Level 3 Diploma in Health and Social Care (Adults) for England (QCF) All Mandatory Units Knowledge and Performance Criteria Unit 1: Promote Communication in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings Unit code: SHC 31 1.1 Identify the different reasons people communicate 1.2 Explain how communication affects relationships in the work setting 2.1 Demonstrate how to establish the communication and language needs, wishes and preferences of individuals 2.2 DescribeRead MoreEssay about Inclusion in Practice730 Words   |  3 Pages(M/601/4070) Promote equality, diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people 3.1 Explain what is meant by inclusion and inclusive practice 3.2 Identify barriers to children and young people’s participation Inclusive practice is a process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging. Inclusion is about ensuring that children and young people, whatever their background or situation, are able to participate fully in all aspects of the Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or... Promote Equality and Inclusion in health, social care or children and young people’s settings What is meant by Equality, Inclusion and Diversity? Equality: Equality of opportunity, giving each person opportunities which are equal to others in society regardless of race, gender or disability. Inclusion: A process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging. Diversity: A wide range of characteristics and backgrounds, including social and cultural backgrounds, different religions, colours of skin, hair types and disabilities. Such diversity contributes to the strength of a community. Describe Potential effects of discrimination. Discrimination can affect people on a physical,†¦show more content†¦Please see appendix A Summarise the following act: ‘The Equality Act 2010’ The Equality Act 2010 brings together previous anti-discrimination laws with a single act making the law easier to understand and more efficient to implement. The Act bans unfair treatment and helps achieve equal opportunities in the work place and in wider society. Describe how to challenge discrimination in a way that promotes change? †¢ Having an array of toys that promote diversity that the children are not used to being exposed to. †¢ Having taster sessions of foods from around the world. †¢ Inviting parents in to the setting to talk about their religion, culture, the language that they speak. †¢ Having a dress up day in which children are invited to dress up in clothes from different countries. †¢ Observing children’s behaviour and attitudes to others in the setting and challenging discrimination through carefully thought out activities. Activities should involve a person’s emotional feelings towards being discriminated against. Using ‘how would you feel activities if†¦Ã¢â‚¬â„¢. Scenario: A child will not hold hands with another child who is of African heritage stating, ‘I want them to wash the black from their hands first’. A member of staff should intervene explaining that people from around the world have different types of hair and colours of skin, this is what makes us all so special. We all have ourShow MoreRelatedPromote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings.620 Words   |  3 PagesPromote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings. 1.1 Explain what is meant by: †¢ Diversity - Each person is individual and unique - Encompass respect and acceptance - It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerance - â€Å"Differences between individuals and groups of people† Diversity is about respecting individual differences these can be: ethnicity, physical abilities, gender, age, religious, beliefs, sexual orientationRead MoreEssay about Unit 53 Equality and Inclusion1425 Words   |  6 Pages UNIT 053- PROMOTE EQUALITY AND INCLUSION IN HEALTH, SOCIAL OR CHILDREN’S AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S SETTINGS 1.1 Diversity- Two definitions of Diversity are: Diversity- acknowledgement of and respect for their individuality. Diversity- celebrating differences and valuing everyone. By respecting visible and invisible differences everyone can feel valued for their contribution, beneficial for both the individual and the setting. Equality- Two definitions of Equality are: Equality- equal opportunitiesRead MoreChampion equality, diversity and inclusion1712 Words   |  7 PagesChampion equality, diversity and inclusion          1.1 Explain the models of practice that underpin equality, diversity and inclusion in own area of responsibility. Equality is to treat all as individuals; to respect race, disability, age, gender, religion, beliefs ,culture and sexual orientation. For all to be open to opportunities, to be treated fairly and respectfully, have rights and equal status in society and for all to reach their full potential. Diversity is to value that we are all uniqueRead MoreCu1532/Shc 33: Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social918 Words   |  4 PagesCU1532/SHC 33: Promote equality and inclusion in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings 1.1. Explain what is meant by: ï‚ · diversity - It means that we are all different from each other. Whether it is our gender, height, weight, ethnic background, religion, beliefs, our personalities, disabilities or sexuality. ï‚ · equality – It means that regardless of our race, gender, or sexuality, everyone should be treated as equal and given the same opportunities to achieve theirRead MoreSch 33 Equality and Inclusion in Health Essay1552 Words   |  7 PagesSHC 33 Promote Equality and Inclusion in Health, Social Care or Children’s and Young People’s Settings 1. Explain what is meant by: Diversity Equality Inclusion Mean by Diversity the differences between individuals and groups in society arising from gender, ethnic origins, social, cultural or religious background, family structure, disabilities, sexuality and appearance. Our society is made up of people with a wide range of characteristics. Where people vary in a multitude of ways, includingRead MoreTDA 3.2 organisation in schools Essay3183 Words   |  13 PagesCommunication and professional relationships with children, young people and adults Knowledge skill 3 2 2 A/601/3326 TDA 3.2 Schools as organisations Knowledge 3 3 3 F/601/4073 TDA 3.3 Support learning activities Knowledge skill 3 4 4 A/601/4069 TDA 3.4 Promote children and young people’s positive behaviour Knowledge skill 3 3 5 H/601/4065 TDA 3.5 Develop professional relationships with children, young people and adults Knowledge skill 3 Read MoreEssay about Inclusion in Practice730 Words   |  3 Pages(M/601/4070) Promote equality, diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people 3.1 Explain what is meant by inclusion and inclusive practice 3.2 Identify barriers to children and young people’s participation Inclusive practice is a process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging. Inclusion is about ensuring that children and young people, whatever their background or situation, are able to participate fully in all aspects of theRead MoreManagement and Manager Induction Standards9580 Words   |  39 Pagesadult social care, including those managing their own support workers 2012 ‘Refreshed’ web edition, with guidance and certificate we help employers to manage their workforces Contents Introduction Core standards 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Governance and accountability Systems and processes to promote communication Partnership working and relationships Using person-centred practice to achieve positive outcomes Team leadership and management Managing resources Equality, diversity and inclusion SafeguardingRead MoreTDA 3.61678 Words   |  7 PagesUnit 306 Promote equality, diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people Outcome 1 Promote equality and diversity in work with children and young people 1.1 Identify the current legislation and codes of practice relevant to the promotion of equality and valuing of diversity The education act is based towards the school responsibilities towards children with special educational needs. It means schools must provide resources, equipment and extra support to meet the needsRead MoreLearning and Social Care Essay examples30870 Words   |  124 PagesCACHE Qualification Specification CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Children and Young People’s Workforce (QCF) CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Children and Young People’s Workforce (QCF) CACHE  © Copyright 2011 All rights reserved worldwide.    Reproduction by approved CACHE centres is permissible for internal use under the following conditions: CACHE has provided this Qualification Specification in Microsoft Word format to enable its Centres to use its content more flexibly within their own

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Philosophy Free Term Papers, Book Reports,s, And Research Essay Example For Students

Philosophy Free Term Papers, Book Reports,s, And Research Essay Ethics can be defined broadly as a set of moral principles or values. Each of us has such a set of values, although we may or may not have clearly expressed them. It is common for people to differ in their moral principles and values and the relative importance they attach to them. These differences reflect life experiences, successes and failures, as well as the influences of parents, teachers, and friends. Ethical behavior is necessary for a society to function in a orderly manner. It can be argued that ethics is the glue that holds a society together. Philosophers, religious organizations, and other groups have defined in various ways ideal sets of moral principles and values. The following are different approaches, from ancient and modern traditions and philosophers, depicting their meaning and understanding of ethics and how it can be applied in ethical decision-making. Utilitarianism was founded by the British philosopher Jeremy Bentham toward the end of the 18th century. He be lieved that all human actions are motivated by a desire to obtain pleasure and avoid pain. The principle of utility expresses that actions were right if they tended to produce the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies right and wrong and also considers the consequences that may result. This can be regarded as an appropriate action, but offers no realistic way to gather necessary information to make the required decision. Confronting certain situations in life, there is no time to weigh all possible outcomes and decide the one that provides the greatest benefit to all; majority of predicaments allow just enough time for a person to act on impulse alone. To calculate the welfare of the people involved in or effected by any given situation, utilitarianism requires that all individuals be considered equally. Quantitative utilitarians would contemplate the pleasure and pain that would be caused and evaluate how bo th sides would be affected. Through this calculation of pleasures and pains, one could tell what was right or wrong. John Stuart Mill, also a British philosopher, modified and expanded on Bentham’s principles. Mill’s approach insists on qualitative utilitarianism, which requires that one consider not only the amount of pain or pleasure, but also the quality of such pain and pleasure. An utilitarian must consider both the consequences of an action and the good and evil that accompanies it. There are advantages and disadvantages in applying this approach to my own life. I know when I am faced with decisions I do find myself weighing all outcomes, what is right and wrong, and what consequences might result. For example, I encountered a dilemma at my summer job two years ago. I was an usher at a concert venue and I was faced with turning my friend’s nephew in for having marijuana on him. It was wrong for him to have the drugs with him but at the same time he would o f gotten into a lot of trouble. Could I do that to my friend? Could I not do anything at all? As I contemplated this problem, I did take the utilitarianism approach in trying to decide what would be the best thing to do to handle this. In the end I did turn him in to my boss, as not only was that my job, but if anything happen as a result of using the drugs I would feel responsible for not notifying someone. The disadvantage to this is that there is not enough necessary information available and there is no scale on which to weigh the various considerations. Granted he was only sentenced to community service, how did I know that he consequences could not have been worse, like being sent to jail. I could of decided to handle it myself instead of turning him into my boss. This approach helps in deciding between right and wrong but when it comes to what the consequences actually are and how everyone in the situation will be affected, there really is no way of knowing. The moral law, al ong with natural law, approach to ethical decision-making, views ethics as a set of rules that must be obeyed without any consideration of the consequences that will follow from doing so or not. It claims that it is impossible to measure right from wrong and prohibits the reliance on consequential calculations and use of any action that aims directly against good intentions. The works of philosophers Aquinas, Hobbes, and Kant coincide with these concepts. Thomas Aquinas, an Italian philosopher and Roman Catholic theologian, believed happiness to be found in the love of God. His conception on right and wrong came from the blending of Aristotle’s teachings and Christianity. His theory on the difference between right and wrong can be regarded by the use of reason and reflection on experience. Thomas Hobbes, an English philosopher, suggests that we are motivated by selfish self interests and because of that, we are better off living in a world of moral rules. Hobbes believes that these self interests are a way of saying that all of our actions are a product of our own beliefs, that people consider themselves to be better than anyone else other than God. Immanuel Kant’s, an German philosopher, ethical system is based on the belief that everything happens for a reason. Our actions, of any sort, are directed by reason. Whether we need to reach a specific outcome or resolution, we choose the action that will accomplish that task or whether that action is the only means necessary and then that particular action must be followed. .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .postImageUrl , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:hover , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:visited , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:active { border:0!important; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:active , .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52 .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u76ca714586990411b77dcf2e84051a52:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Juvenile Delinquency and Society Essay I do not totally agree with this approach of moral and natural law. Having to always conform to certain set of rules without even thinking possible consequences and alternative approaches does not really appeal to me. I also believe that it is possible to measure what is right and wrong. It is based on our own beliefs and values that are instilled in each one of us that can answer this question. I always feel like I have the devil on one shoulder and the angel on the other. You always think of both circumstances, good and evil, and you as a person will decide what is morally and ethically appropriate for you. I don’t think relying on a specific set of rules and principles is the best way to handle dilemmas. I think it is a good framework and guidance to base your decision on, but to have to adhere to it on every decision I don’t agree on. For example, I am Catholic and ever since I went away to college certain aspects of my faith are I am starting to become against. My parents always follow the way of our Church and the values and principles that Catholics are suppose to obey. I tend to differ with them. We had this argument recently about topics that Catholics are for and against and my mother could not believe that I would go against them. Birth control and abortion was the main difference. She is totally against it in all situations. I disagree when it comes to rape or incest, I don’t feel a woman should have to go through the pregnancy in this specific situation. So this approach, having to rely on principles all the time and follow them accordingly to every situation does not agree with me. It is helpful to read about these different theories but I do not think it is necessary in decision-making. Reading about these approaches does make you think about how you as person handles certain situations and whether you can improve your process. However, this only happens when you are required to read and study about these theories. If I never took this class, I would never have known the difference between utilitarianism and moral law and which one applies to me and my decision making process. Therefore, it is not required to read and learn about different approaches in order to handle situations. Philosophy Essays

Monday, March 9, 2020

Lucozade Essays

Lucozade Essays Lucozade Paper Lucozade Paper 1: Introduction This report will critically be discussing the marketing strategy, position and the marketing mix employed by LUCOZADE and the use of some principles. Therefore, the analysis will help to identify how brand is positioned in the energy drinks market and how company promotes its product. After analysing existing marketing strategies, recommended future strategies will be given to advice companies of where the brands are leading to and how they will get there. 1. 1 Company Introduction LUCOZADE A pharmacist in Newcastle formulated Lucozade in 1927. He formulated an easily digestible glucose drink that could help recovery from sickness by providing them with energy when they did not feel like eating food. In 1938 the brand was bought by Beecham and was distributed nationwide, soon becoming renowned across the country as a trusted symbol of recovery. However, by the 1970s there was a decreasing role for Lucozade in people’s lives as the general population began to grow healthier as the incidence of illness became less frequent. As a result, sales of Lucozade began to drop. An initial brand repositioning, which remained rooted in health and recovery, sought to position Lucozade as a healthy provider of energy to help people recover from the natural daily lulls in energy they might suffer during the day. It was in 1982 that the most significant and successful re-positioning took place. ‘Aids recovery’ was removed from the bottle and was replaced with ‘Replaces lost energy’. Lucozade became a brand that could provide energetic, busy and successful people with the energy they needed to perform to their full potential. In 1990 the Lucozade brand diversified further with the launch of Lucozade Sport, a range of isotonic sports drinks. In balance with your natural body fluids, the brand promised to ‘get to your thirst, fast’. More recently, Lucozade Sport Hydro Active was launched in 2003. 1. 2 Report Summary The objectives of this report for LUCOZADE are: 1. To show how Lucozade develops its marketing strategy and identify the principles and processes involved. 2. To describe the tools and techniques used to produce a strategic marketing plan and show clearly how these have been applied. 3. To investigate whether Lucozade used option generation and evaluation in developing the strategic marketing plan. 4. To develop and produce a written strategic marketing plan for Lucozade. Section 2: Red Bull’s Marketing Strategy The UK total cold drinks market is large and competitive, with many powerful and famous brands with large marketing budgets competing for share. As a result, the market can be an ever-evolving test for brands that wish to continue to grow in a category that is currently worth ? 3. 55 billion. Within the cold drinks market, increases in the soft drinks category have been slowing. However, growth has been driven considerably by the Energy drink sector, which was worth an estimated ? 940 million in 2006 and has grown +26% since 2003. (Source: Mintel Energy Stimulant drinks Market Report August 2006). The Energy drink category continues to grow at pace with brand extensions and new entrants to the market emerging every year. This represents both a challenge and an opportunity for the category’s leading brands. (Source: Nielsen value share data, MAT to December 27th 2006). Since its launch, Lucozade has been the market leader in the Energy drink category with just under 60% value share of the category. Key competitors include Red Bull and PowerAde with 27% and 4. 5% value share respectively. 2003 also witnessed the introduction of several Private Label sport and energy drink launches from the major grocers. The rest of the market is made up with a plethora of smaller brands, predominantly operating in the stimulant drinks sector, and distributed via the Impulse channel and the on-trade environment. | |Red Bull |Solstis |Lucozade Original Energy |Purdeys |Red Devil |Feelfine |Tesco Kick | |Average price |? . 96 |? 0. 90 |? 0. 75 |? 0. 70 |? 0. 90 |? 1. 09 |? 0. 48p | |Pack size |250ml |250ml |380ml |330ml |250ml |250ml |250ml | Section 3: Strategic Marketing Plan 3. 1 PEST Analysis of Red Bull |POLITICAL |If Government imposes health and safety restrictions on the amount of energy drinks that should| | |be consumed, it would affect the amount of energy drinks that are bought. | |If Government introduce import/export charges on the energy drinks market, it may increase/ | | |decrease the amount of energy drinks that are imported and exported. | |ECONOMIC |Inflation would increase the price of drinks and at the same time, consumers’ real disposable | | |income will reduce. Therefore, consumers are likely to buy less energy drinks, as they are not | | |necessities. |SOCIETAL |If company decides to launch its product in a new country, its costs may rise, as it will have | | |to produce different language labels. | | |As the population of youths increase, energy drinks companies may see an increase in the amount| | |of drinks sold. | |TECHNOLOGICAL |More hi-tech technology may enable companies to produce more drinks at a cheaper cost and at | | |the same time improving the quality of the packaging. | |Companies can use the Internet to help advertise and promote its products. It can also sell | | |large quantities of its product direct to its consumers. It is a new way to communicate with | | |consumers i. e. cheap and efficient market research method. | 3. 2 SWOT Analysis of Red Bull Strengths 1. Red Bull is a leader in the ever-growing niche market of energy drinks. 2. The brand has a strong footbold in major markets such as Germany and UK and more recently, (since 2002), the vast US market. 3. Red Bull has a distribution agreement with Cadbury Schweppes; this is positive for further international expansion of the brand. 4. Its network of international subsidiaries are well-developed and will aid the company to effectively move products throughout the globe. Weaknesses 1. Since Red Bull is a private company, it has very few sources to generate capital for international growth and internal expansion in comparison with its public competition. . Red Bull has a lack of diversification in its drinks, although it did release its sugar-free version in 2003. Hence, the company is ‘missing out’ on potential profits that exist in other soft-drink sub sectors. 3. Red Bull firm focus on energy drinks, and hence, if there were to be a drop in demand in the future, it would be left highly vulnerable. Opportunities 1. Red Bull is still quite a new pr oduct in the growing functional drinks market, which leaves a lot of room for development in major markets (eg: UK and US) 2. Expansion of Red Bull’s original line may help to strengthen its customer base (eg: as was seen with the release of Red Bull Sugarfree in 2003) 3. The development of a functional drink is a possibility. Since Red Bull is normally consumed before participation in a sporting event, the company could create an apre-sport, hydrating drink that also replenished vitamis and minerals lost from physical exertion. 4. Continuation of its tradition of entering new markets through the process of on-trade, has potential on an international level. Threats 1. Many ‘copycat’ energy drinks such as Mad Bull and Red Devil threaten to take brand share from Red Bull. Although the company has won most lawsuits, litigation is expensive and the damages remain undisclosed. 2. Red Bull’s sales are threatened by the continued into the drinks market by key drink players such as Coca-Cola with its Powerade brand. 3. Since Red Bull is high In caffeine content and stimulant taurine, it is subject to regulation such as warning labels on cans which the EU imposed in 2002. Furthermore, the drink has been subject to negative press. For example, in Ireland, It was linked to the death of a student (1999) and a murder case (2001). 4. Many small operators also act as a threat because they have a high ‘cool’ value amongst younger consumers with whom energy drinks are popular. 3. 3 Market Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning Here, the notions of market segmentation, targeting and positioning are key to the success of firms’ marketing efforts. Kotler and Armstrong (2004) provide a useful definition: â€Å"Dividing a market into distinct groups with distinct needs, characteristics, or behaviour who might require separate products or marketing mixes (239). Segmentation is important because firms cannot appeal to all customers at once, especially not with the same offering. Rather, firms need to design products and services that fit with particular groups of individuals. Firms can segment their market in a number of ways, including geographical, demographic, psychographic and behavioural segmentation. Kotler and Armstrong (2004: 239-244) provide useful definitions: Geographic segmentation: â€Å"Dividing a market into different geographical units such as nations, states, regions, countries, cities, or neighbourhoods†; Demographic segmentation: â€Å"Dividing the market into groups based on demographic variables such as age, gender, family size, family life cycle, income, occupation, education, religion, race, generation, and nationality†; Psychographic segmentation: â€Å"Dividing a market into different groups based on social class, lifestyle, or personality characteristics†; and Behavioural segmentation: â€Å"Dividing a market into groups based on consumer knowledge, attitude, use, or response to a product. † Firms may also choose to segment a market using more than one mode of segmentation, such as geo-demographic segmentation. In order to segment a market effectively, the segment must be measurable, accessible, substantial, differentiable and actio nable. Once segmented, a firm should target specific segments. Kotler and Armstrong (2004) provide a useful definition: â€Å"The process of evaluating each market segment’s attractiveness and selecting one or more segments to enter† (239). When firms evaluate the attractiveness of different market segments, they should examine its size and growth, structural attractiveness and the firm’s own objectives and resources. A large or fast growing market may not be the most attractive in the long-term or necessarily fit with the firm’s ability to take advantage of in the near-term. Structural factors, such as those discussed by Porter (1980) including barriers to entry and the intensity of rivalry amongst incumbents will also highlight the likelihood of a new entrant to appropriate existing rents. Ultimately, a firm must select those market segments that it wishes to target, which consist of groups of buyers with relatively homogenous needs or characteristics. The type of marketing strategy that should be employed will vary on the target market, but will broadly fit along four types described by Kotler and Armstrong (2004: 252-254): Undifferentiated (mass) marketing: â€Å"A market-coverage strategy in which a firm decides to ignore market segment differences and go after the whole market with one offer†; Differentiated (segmented) marketing: â€Å"A market-coverage strategy in which a firm decides to target several market segments and designs separate offers for each†; Concentrated (niche) marketing: â€Å"A market-coverage strategy in which a firm goes after a large share of one or a few segments or niches†; and Micromarketing: â€Å"The practice of tailoring products and marketing programs to the needs and wants of specific individuals and local customer groups – includes local marketing and individual marketing. † Choosing an appropriate target-marketing strategy will depend on a number of factors. A firm’s resources will determine its ability to serve a wide (or otherwise) market effectively, whilst product and market variability will dictate the need to differentiate the offering and the specific types of customers that may be attracted to its attributes. The placement of the product within the product life cycle will also have an impact, as will the marketing strategies of competitors. Once a firm has selected the segment(s) within which it wishes to compete, it must then choose a specific position within said segment(s) where it will distinguish itself (Kotler and Keller, 2006). This is known as market position (Kotler and Armstrong, 2004): â€Å"Arranging for a product to occupy a clear, distinctive, and desirable place relative to competing products in the minds of target customers† (239). The requirement of market positioning refers more broadly to the notion of competitive advantage. Porter (1985) argued that the purpose of strategic management was: â€Å"to establish a profitable and sustainable position against the forces that determine industry competition†. As such, firms should first identify the unique structure of their industry, in terms of the five forces – the threat of new entrants, the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers, the threat of substitute products and the intensity of rivalry amongst competing firms – that influence levels of competition. On this understanding, firms should then choose to compete on the basis of one of three generic strategic, whether that is overall cost leadership, differentiation or focus (Porter, 1980). Failure to do so will leave firms â€Å"stuck in the middle† (Porter, 1985: 16). The analysis of the firm’s value chain, which exposes its primary and support activities and their contribution to value added, helped the firm to identify the most appropriate generic strategy, as well as adapt its value chain accordingly to better suit the selected strategy and build competitive advantage (Porter, 1985). In this respect, marketers should seek to establish a unique selling point (USP) and strong value proposition that stresses the rationale for buying one firm’s products over another. 3. 4 Red Bull’s Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning Strategy ‘Red Bull gives you wings. This is Red Bull’s international slogan for its energy drink, a product which states not only to increase reaction speed and physical strength, but also to improve the concentration and alertness of consumers. Red Bull is a popular drink amonst men in particular, with its lar gest consumers consiting of athletes, students, and night-clubbers in need of a late night lift. However, the brand is marketed to ‘opinion leaders and hard-working people with active lifestyles’, as the company’s website claims. RED BULL with sugar: |Demographics |Men and women aged 16-29 | |Geographics |Mainly people who are situated in the city, as they are likely to be really busy and tired. Red Bull | | |seems to have a cooler in most bars and clubs in the city as well as in convenient stores. | |Psychographics |People who are tired / stressed and want to relax and have fun. | |Behavioural |Students and young professionals to boost energy during work long day at work. | RED BULL sugar-free: |Demographics |Women aged 16-29 | |Geographics |Mainly in the city where there are many young professional women. | |Psychographics |Drivers who are tired and need and increase in concentration. Women who want an energy boost but are | | |on a diet. |Behavioural |Women who own a car and use it often for long journeys or are always stuck in traffic after work. As | | |well as tired health | Red Bull is one of the dominant forces in the ? 940 million energy drink market. As of 2006, the market had grown 26% since 2004. *Lucozade holds a 60% market share. Its next biggest competitor is Red Bull, with 27% market share (Nielsen value share data, 2006). Lucozade was initially developed as a health recovery product. In the 1980’s it enjoyed a successful repositioning that made it one of the first products targeted at healthy adults who needed energy boost. Since that repositioning it has concentrated on building relationship based partnerships with sporting events, iconic athletes and cutting edge community happenings where it can emphasize its long company history, top notch science and consumer brand familiarity and fondness. Lucozade follows a strategy of brand product expansion. Its makers respond to, and in some ways, drive trends in sports, fitness and energy recovery. There always seems to be a new flavor or new product. These new product’s attributes mirror the changing values and needs of each target consumer. Advertising links the product with known characters that consumers can aspire to, or rely heavily on logical and educational information that emphasize the â€Å"smartness† of users. In contrast, Red Bull succeeds by remaining exactly the same. Consumers can choose with sugar or without. There is no other choice. Instead, Red Bull remains responsive to consumers by expanding the situations where using the product is appropriate. As founder Dietrich Mateschitz says â€Å"We don’t bring the product to the people, we bring people to the product. † Marketing messages are fast paced and quirky. They create lightly specific situations that consumers can relate to, such as driving fatigue, and link Red Bull to the situation as a solution. *Lucozade: Other energy drink brand Red Bull marketing maintains a sense of product mystique that makes consumers feel special, as if they’ve discovered something no one else knows about. Customers can relate to the experience they were having when they encountered the drink and they adjust their values to the attributes of the product. Section 4: Developing and Producing a Strategic Marketing Plan 4. 1 Effectiveness of the Current Plan |Product |Red Bull was launched 17 years ago in 1987. Since then, it has stayed focused on one product. One size. One | | |colour. One sticky, sweet taste. | | |However, in 2003 Red Bull launched a sugar-free version of its original drink. The ingredients are the same | | |apart from the elimination of glucose and sucrose. | | |Red Bull is produced from a number of key ingredients: taurine, glucuronolactone and caffeine. A combination | | |of these ingredients when consumed, should: | | |Increase physical endurance | | |Improve concentration and reaction speed | | |Improves vigilance | | |Stimulates metabolism. | | |Red Bull is packaged in a slim, sleek, silver can. It isn’t sold in a bottle and it doesn’t have script | | |lettering like Coke or Pepsi. This makes it different to other energy drinks. However, many competitors are | | |now launching products, which look incredibly similar to Red Bull. | |Price |Prices range from ? 0. 96 ? 1. 90. | |Promotion |Red Bull’s promotion campaign is sleek and small and original. Even its most profitable strategies have a | | |very low cost. | | |Red Bull has a very effective marketing force: student brand managers. They provide student representatives | | |with free cases of its energy drink and then encourage them to throw a party. By doing so, the good word | | |about Red Bull is spread quickly and cheaply. | |There have been rumours that Red Bull is unsafe for minors and that the drink was linked to the deaths of | | |various teenagers. France has banned the sale of Red Bull altogether. However, Red Bull remains a popular | | |brand and they say that the rumours add to the brand’s mystique. | | |Another way that Red Bull markets its drinks is through people who drive around in Mini’s and Beetle’s with a| | |giant Red Bull can on the back. They find people who need energy and give them a free can of Red Bull. This | | |is a way to introduce Red Bull to the masses. | | |Red Bull relies heavily on bars and nightclubs to help promote its product. Alternative sports have also | | |proven to be a successful product trial arena; the company underwrites a number of extreme sports | | |competitions. Events include the Red Bull Huckfest, a ski and snowboard freestyle competition held in January| | |in Utah; and the Red Bull ‘Flugtag’ (German for flying day), amateur pilots will create exotic flying | | |machines and attempt to soar off the pier. | | |Red Bull uses TV advertising as well, these all feature whimsical sketches of a mysterious Austrian artist. | | |These advertisements serve more to amuse rather than to educate or entice consumers. | Place |Cans of Red Bull and Red Bull Sugarfree are sold in over 100 countries and are mainly sold in retail outlets and | | |bars/clubs in the city. | It has been established previously that the Energy Drinks Market is competitive and continues to grow; there are numerous competitors who emerge each year. Because this market is so competitive, Red Bull need to adopt good quali ty marketing strategies. Red Bull is produced by a private firm, GlaxoSmithKline. Since Red Bull is a private company, it has very few resources to generate capital for new expansion projects in comparison with GlaxoSmithKline. Red Bull was launched in 1987, since its launch, Red Bull has developed rapidly and as a consequence, it has attracted many imitators. Despite these imitators, Red Bull has still maintained its market share. Red Bull has always been promoted with the advertising slogan of ‘Red Bull gives you wings’ and focuses on the stimulant properties of the drink. It hasn’t created new products or re-positioned from its original product. However, a sugar-free version of Red Bull was launched in 2003. This lack of diversification hasn’t affected the sales volume of Red Bull, but they may have missed out on potential profits that exist in other drinks sub-sectors. Red Bull is aimed at men and women who are aged between 16-29. It is targeted at those who are situated in the city as they are likely to be busy and tired after a long day at work. It is also aimed at students who go out to bars and clubs after a long day. Red Bull’s promotion mix: Internet Ambient media Red Bull is not sponsored by such organisations; however, it sponsors extreme sports events. Most of Red bull’s promotional activities revolve around sports, and in particular, ‘extreme sports’ which was sourced from the founder, Dietrich Mateschitz, who had a deep interest in snowboarding and skateboarding. These implications are very obvious on the company’s website which includes lists of the many athletes that consume red bull. Such sports include paragliding and surfing. The Red Bull ‘Flugtag’ proves to be a successful way of promoting its product. The ‘Flugtag’ is an opportunity for amateur pilots to create crazy flying machines and attempt to fly off the pier. This has proved to be very popular with many younger people and ties in with the fact that Red Bull has a very effective and low-cost marketing force: student brand managers. Red Bull doesn’t limit its activities to sporting events. It also focuses on promoting its products on school campuses where it pushes brand leaders to sell the product on site. An example of this is in Australia, where literature was handed out, claiming that Red Bull stimulates the brain cells, and therefore the capability to study. Although Red Bull is generally produced for consumption during or rior to times of physical or emotional strain, it also has a reputation of a mixer and hence, sponsors Red Bull Music Academy. Through these strategies, Red Bull can develop a relationship with its consumers and the events which they host provide a good opportunity for youngsters to experience new events and have fun. Even their television advertisements seem to humour the consumers rather than to promote Red Bull. However, because of its high content of caffeine, Red Bull remains in a niche market as it is unsuitable for children under 16, the elderly and pregnant women. 4. 2 Recommendations for Improvement After extensively analysing Red Bull I have come up with various ways in which Red Bull can maintain its market share within this competitive market. In the close future, Red Bull should maintain to develop its international scope, through entering new markets and increasing its strong grip in countries that it already exists in. The best markets at the moment would be markets where energy drinks are only beginning to takeoff (ie: Southern Europe), and not markets such as the UK, due to the ever-increasing pressure from rival drinks. In the US, the market where Red Bull has been gaining strength rapidly since its 1997 launch, space still remains for growth due to the fact that the brand was only available in half of all US convenience stores in 2002. Due to the ever-increasing popularity of energy drinks, the company’s client base also has room to expand and should continue to do so. However, the various lawsuits pursued by the company are indicative of trading difficulties, in particular, the protection of the Red Bull brand, and such difficulties are likely to continue. Red Bull’s 2003 release of sugar-free sub-brand does not appear to have boosted sales. However, despite the first ever variant in the Red Bull portfolio receiving a lukewarm reception, the company may try boosting sales with either another line extension, or even through the development of another brand entirely. Within functional drinks alone, the company has many unexplored avenues available to it, such as hydrating beverage for those fortified with vitamins and minerals. This could also be an advantage to Red Bull just in case the market for energy drinks decrease. In conclusion, strategies that manipulate the market share division are more appropriate to a mature product segment. As long as the energy drink total market grows, both companies should focus on solidifying their consumer base. After the growth of the product market itself stabilizes, than focus in marketing will change to emphasize product switching. Red Bull could develop a brand new product which it could market to its existing client base, but they would firstly have to undertake a lot of research to see whether the new product would be suitable.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Solutions of Slow Housekeeping Service in Palomar Hotel Research Paper - 1

Solutions of Slow Housekeeping Service in Palomar Hotel - Research Paper Example The researcher states that the nature of the problem requires that the staff offering housekeeping services obtain more training as a way of enhancing their effectiveness in the delivery of this service to customers. The training will equip the staff with the necessary skills needed to ensure service delivery is up to date. The upgrading of the Property Management Systems will also ensure that the failures in the hotel identified easily and countered before they lead to massive customer effects that would signal dissatisfaction that would lead to loss of customers. Through the implementation of these two solutions, the problem at Palomar Hotel proves easy to detect earlier and handle to maintain the level of service delivery. From the above, the thesis of the study is to develop the two solutions of staff training and improvement of Property Management Systems in order to address the problem of slow housekeeping services at the hotel. Through the thesis, the problem will become addre ssed and will help guide the company back into proper customer management aspects that will promote the service delivery and promote customer satisfaction. These are all detailed in the body of the work that follows. The different solutions as provided in the introduction are the provision of additional training for the staff that deals with housekeeping services and the upgrading of the Property Management Systems (PMS). Considering these aspects in relation to the customer comments that reflected the time taken for cleaning a room, the delays in response to customer calls and the delays in delivery of towels that indicated delays in responding to customer needs, the company needs to ensure the situation improves to avoid major effects in customer satisfaction. Additional training to the staff to provide more refresher information to guide them in responding to customer requests will improve the level of speed with which housekeeping services are conducted. Additional training will enable the employees to learn how to handle customer request and the response to give to ensure the customer feels attended to.